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Joan Harper

24 June 2013 | Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

The life and times of Frank Calder are chronicled in a new biography, the first of its kind, He Moved A Mountain: The Life of Frank Calder and The Nisga’a Land Claims Accord (Ronsdale Press, 2013). Its author Joan Harper discusses Calder and the writing of this book, with Joseph Planta.


He Moved A Mountain: The Life of Frank Calder and The Nisga’a Land Claims Accord by Joan Harper (Ronsdale Press, 2013).

Click to buy this book from Amazon.ca: He Moved A Mountain: The Life of Frank Calder and The Nisga’a Land Claims Accord


Text of introduction by Joseph Planta:

I am Planta: On the Line, in Vancouver, at TheCommentary.ca.

There’s a new biography of Frank Calder out now. It’s called He Moved A Mountain: The Life of Frank Calder and The Nisga’a Land Claims Accord. Its author Joan Harper joins me now to talk about writing it, as well as who Calder was, and just how meaningful he was to the history and politics of British Columbia. Calder was born into the Nisga’a nation on the Nass River in Northern British Columbia. He went on to become the first aboriginal person elected to a Canadian legislature. He served twenty-six years as an MLA here in BC, and was a pivotal force in the area of recognition of Aboriginal land title. I’ll get Ms. Harper to tell us about the Calder Case and its ramifications. The Nisga’a Nation bestowed on Calder, the title of ‘Chief of Chiefs,’ one of many honours Calder held, including the Order of Canada and various honorary degrees. Joan Harper’s career was in the field of library education at the Vancouver School Board and the University of British Columbia. The book is published by Ronsdale Press. Please welcome to the Planta: On the Line program in Sechelt, British Columbia, Joan Harper; Ms. Harper, good morning.

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