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George Garrett

27 February 2015 | Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

The legendary reporter George Garrett, retired from CKNW since 1999, discusses his illustrious career in journalism, Alzheimer’s Disease advocacy, the state of the media today, and many of the memorable people that he’s called colleagues over the years, with Joseph Planta.


Text of introduction by Joseph Planta:

I am Planta: On the Line, in Vancouver, at TheCommentary.ca.

For a lot of people who’ve lived in this part of the world George Garrett is a name that suggests credibility, reliability, and honesty. For a lot of us who grew up listening to Vancouver radio, he was the intrepid reporter, who broke stories constantly. For folks in the news business in this town, he is regarded as a legend. On the occasion of his retirement from journalism in 1999, the Vancouver Sun editorialised: ‘His kindness and yes, old-fashioned gentlemanliness are as legendary as his industry and his insatiable curiosity. He maintained both the trust of his contacts and professional objectivity—the recipe for routinely scooping all comers.’ Apt praise following 43 years in the business, most of which were spent at CKNW. George Garrett joins me now. We’ll reflect on his years in journalism, and what he’s done in his sixteen years or so in retirement. We’ll talk about Alzheimer’s disease, as his wife Joan is in the throes of it, and we’ll highlight his efforts to raise awareness in the community. In 1996, George Garrett received the Bruce Hutchison Lifetime Achievement Award from the Jack Webster Foundation. And in 2004, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the BC Association of Broadcasters. It’s a great pleasure to welcome to the Planta: On the Line program, in studio as it were, George Garrett; Mr. Garrett, good morning.

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